Thursday, May 6

Month: October 2015

Featured News

Shepherd One: How the Pope Flew Across the U.S.

Charter planes are typically the mode of air travel for the wealthy, the influential, and/or the powerful, as data from 2013 shows that 0.9% of respondents who came from a household where the annual income was $200,000 USD or more stated that they had used a charter service. As you might expect, it's how the Bishop of Rome, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province, Sovereign of the State of Vatican City, Pope Francis flew during his trip to the United States. Not just any aircraft, though. Pope Francis toured the U.S. on the Shepherd One. The American Airlines Boeing 777-200 aircraft flew the Pope from Andrews Air Force Base in suburban Maryland to New York's JFK International Airport to the Phil...
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Georgia Hospital Updates Electronic Medical Records Systems as Part of Bigger Project

As experts and professionals across the country try to find better ways to cut costs in the healthcare industry, one of the fastest growing trends is to utilize electronic medical record (EMR) services. Phoebe Putney Memorial Hospital in Albany, Georgia, is one of the entities that's making the move to improve and expand their electronic medical record software, according to the Albany ABC affiliate WALB.com. Earlier this month, the Phoebe Putney Health System began using an EMR system from MEDITECH, a Massachusetts-area medical software and service company, in their hospital. The move to this new system was just one part of their ongoing efforts to improve the overall functionality as part of their ProjectONE plan to streamline regional healthcare systems and provide better individuali...
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Wisconsin Plumbers Help Bring Sanitation to India

Most people don't spend much time thinking about global issues, such as sanitation. But four Wisconsin plumbers will help Team USA compete in a world plumbing challenge to bring sanitation to India's poor. In the town of Nashik, India, there are 500 students sharing two bathrooms. Both of those bathrooms are dirtied with feces and dirt on walls and floors and are the only ones the students have access to. The job of Team USA is to remedy these issues. Adam Koenigs is one of the plumbers representing the United States. He told local news station ABC 2 in Green Bay, WI, that, “It’s difficult to understand what we’re going to see when we get there. It’s a whole different world.” Koenigs is joined on Team USA by a plumbing apprentice, Peter Hollmaier, and two engineers from Milwaukee....
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Pools Will Soon Be Able To Disappear Into The Floor

According to a recent report from the Wall Street Journal, the modern swimming pool is ready to receive a new upgrade in the form of a disappearing pool. Better known as a movable floor, this function allows pool owners to raise the floor of their pool to meet the surface, hiding the pool underneath and giving the owners a usable patio. The raised floor can hold between 20 and 60 pounds per square foot, which will be strong enough to support people, patio furniture, and even a car. Then, when the owner is ready to use the pool, the hydraulic system will lower the floor and create a pool of any depth from a shallow kiddie pool to a more advanced lap pool. The price range for the movable floors is anywhere from $300 to $550 per square foot, making it a luxury item for the time being. T...
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Report Shows Safest and Most Dangerous States for Car Accidents

A new report has broken down each state by car accident deaths to show the safest and most dangerous states for drivers. Researchers Michael Sivak and Brandon Schoettle from the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute looked at statistics from 2013 to find answers. They took a look at statistics on traffic fatalities in the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration database. In addition to finding the death rate for traffic deaths, they also did the math to figure out how those deaths compared to the rest of the deaths in each state. The interesting thing about their research was that their findings were unexpected. States with higher traffic congestion seem to be the obvious choice for a higher death rate, but their findings actually proved the opposite. They f...
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U.S. Military Scours the Atlantic for Survivors of Shipwreck Caused by Hurricane Joaquin

U.S. military rescue teams from the Coast Guard and Navy are searching for survivors of a fatal shipwreck that was caused by the devastating conditions of Hurricane Joaquin. According to CBS News, a cargo ship named El Faro was destroyed last week as its captain attempted to bypass the hurricane. Rescuers are desperately scouring the area where the ship is presumed to have sunk in an attempt to locate possible survivors. The 790-foot ship was carrying vehicles and other large industrial goods from Jacksonville to Puerto Rico when it sank in the Atlantic Ocean near the Bahamas. Also on board were 33 crew members, one of whom was found dead in a survival suit upon the arrival of rescue teams. El Faro is presumed to have been disabled while bypassing the storm due to a mechanical fai...
State Incentives Attract Data Centers
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State Incentives Attract Data Centers

In Kansas City, MO, there is an old limestone mine that had seemed perfect to house a data center. With numerous benefits to give the potential center, it seemed they were the best choice, and yet they lost the project. Why? They lost because they didn't provide tax breaks. Several huge companies have turned down the potential site in favor of going to Kansas, or in one case, North Carolina. They lost these major projects because of the simple factor of not having tax breaks. "There were people who wouldn't even come and look," said Ora Reynolds, president and chief executive of Hunt Midwest Enterprises Inc., which has been marketing its SubTropolis caves. She says she has learned that financial incentives were "absolutely crucial." This competition between states has been hap...
Encinitas Opens City’s First Community Garden
Featured News

Encinitas Opens City’s First Community Garden

Like the 113.5 million people who garden annually in the U.S., the citizens of Encinitas, California, are ready to reap their harvest now that their community garden is finally finished. According to a recent story by the The San Diego Union-Tribune, the garden has been seven years in the making, and the community couldn't be happier to see the fruits of their labors blossoming. Gordon Smith, member of the garden board, remembers all of the steps that they had to take in order to complete the garden, like overcoming financial setbacks and zoning problems. "I know it's taken a long time, but it's almost been worth it." The garden is now far from all the strife of the past, and is available for visit at 441 Quail Gardens Drive, across from the San Diego Botanic Garden, as well as the S...